800-255-0776

Performance

Technical Information / Performance

Simple Saver System vs. Traditional

The Simple Saver System® is designed to solve the defects of “traditional” compression insulating methods. Properly placing and sealing the liner system to create the full required insulation space minimizes insulation compression and assure the ultimate performance.

Simple Saver System vs. Long Tab and Over-the-purlin


Single & Double Layer Assemblies Compare Simple Saver System®
Insulation is compressed throughout entire purlin cavity and directly above the purlins Severe Insulation Compression Minimal Full designed thickness of lower layers of insulation and top layer of insulation is slightly compressed at purlins
Purlins are left exposed to the interior and require painting for a consistent, finished appearance Unfinished Appearance Finished Purlins are hidden and the liner system creates a clean, finished ceiling grid appearance
Improper placement outside of dew point line may result in condensation and corrosion Defective Vapor Retarder Placement Correct Properly placed below the purlins to help prevent condensation and corrosion
The integrity of the vapor retarder is compromised by stapled or poorly sealed seams every few feet Interrupted Vapor Retarder Integrity Continuous Custom sized vapor retarder typically spans the entire bay and is sealed to primary building structure
Laminated facings have a variety of strength and durability limitations Varies Vapor Retarder Strength Durable Fabric liner is engineered to be strong and durable for longevity and job site safety
Purlins are left exposed and they radiate heat in the summer and absorb and lose heat in the winter Exposed Conductive Purlins Isolated Purlins are encapsulated from the interior conditioned space
Exposed purlins absorb light and cast shadows requiring unnecessary lighting Low Light Reflectance High Concealed purlins and bright white fabric liner increases light reflectivity and light diffusion
Horizontal purlin bracing restricts insulation recovery throughout the purlin cavity Yes Bracing Interference No Unfaced insulation can easily be cut to fit around horizontal purlin bracing and does not restrict or limit insulation recovery

Items That Affect Thermal Performance

Thermal Design has identified three primary items that essentially helps indicate the performance of any type of fiberglass insulation system installed in metal building roofs.

1) Insulation Recovery

In order for fiberglass insulation to reach it's true effectiveness, it's crucial that the fiberglass is able to rapidly recover to expected thickness level prior to installation and the insulation assembly itself, does not promote compression once installed.


2) Space

Thermal Design recommends filling the cavity space with insulation to assure to assure high in place R-values and to avoid possible condensation problems. 'Space' can be broken down to two primary areas.

1. Cavity Width – the distance from purlin to purlin. The width of the fiberglass should fit the entire width of each purlin space without gaps along the vertical web of the purlin.

2. Assembly Height (not purlin height) – the distance from the bottom of the insulation assembly (vapor retarder) to the bottom side of the roof panel. Assembly height accounts for purlin height, bracing restrictions, insulation deflection, and any spacer/stand-off distance above the purlin; whereas purlin height doesn't account for those items.


3) Vapor Retarder Placement

Ideally the conductive steel purlins are isolated from the conditioned space otherwise the steel purlins will radiate unwanted heat inside the building during the summer and absorb and transfer heat outside the space in the winter. Improper placement outside the dew point line commonly results in condensation and corrosion problems.

This picture makes it easy to identify where the roof purlins (secondary framing)
are located and is a good example how the purlins absorb and transfer the heat
to the exterior of the building during cold winter months.


View Dew Point Table

Simple Saver System Long Tap Banded System with compressed insulation
Simple Saver System® Filled Cavity/Long Tab

Simple Saver System® Filled Cavity/Long Tab
Bottom layer of unfaced fiberglass is uncompressed and full thickness, installed parallel between purlins. Upper layer of unfaced fiberglass installed perpendicular to purlins.

Support: steel strap grid pattern. Bottom side installation required.
Bottom layer of faced fiberglass should be uncompressed and full thickness and installed parallel between purlins to achieve better performance. Upper layer of unfaced fiberglass installed perpendicular to purlins.

Support: steel strap. Bottom side installation required.

Purlin Bracing (Purlin Stiffeners) Interference:

Purlin bracing is supplied and engineered by the metal building manufacturer as a necessary component of the building.

Unfaced insulation is easily cut at bracing, fluffed and recovered to full thickness.

Installation Detail

Faced insulation is limited based on the depth and location of bracing and prohibits recovery to full thickness.
Simple Saver System full thickness insulation long tab istallation with exposed purlins

Simple Saver System® Filled Cavity/Long Tab
Cavity width:    
Non-standardized purlin spacing is typically not an issue because the vapor retarder is not glued or laminated onto the fiberglass. Unfaced insulation is cut to size between/parallel with the purlins, completely filling the cavity width. Non-standardized purlin spacing may develop issues on specific cavity widths in order for the fiberglass to fit snug between/parallel each of the purlins. The fiberglass insulation needs to be cut to size between purlins in order to fill the cavity width prior to having the vapor retarder glued or laminated onto the fiberglass. The laminated vapor retarder needs to use tabs of sufficient length on either side of the fiberglass, to follow up vertical purlin web and wrapped and sealed along top of purlin flange.

TOP: Screw down roof without thermal spacer blocks. No purlin bracing shown in the purlin cavity.

BOTTOM: Standing seam roof with thermal spacer blocks atop the purlins. Purlin bracing present in the cavity. Unfaced fiberglass insulation cut and fluffed around purlin bracing, maintaining desired thickness.

TOP: Screw down roof without thermal spacer blocks. No purlin bracing shown in the purlin cavity.

BOTTOM: Standing seam roof with thermal spacer blocks atop the purlins. Purlin bracing present in the cavity. Faced fiberglass insulation restricted and compressed by purlin bracing limiting desired thickness.

Assembly Height:    
Assembly height is measured from the deflection at the Syseal® fabric to the bottom of the roof panel. Assembly height is measured from bottom of the laminated faced insulation to the bottom of the roof panel.

Simple Saver System® Filled Cavity/Long Tab
Simple Saver System dew pointSyseal fabric (vapor retarder) installed below all roof purlins, isolating entire steel purlins from the conditioned space typically with a single piece of fabric made to fit each bay. Each individual piece of vapor retarder is installed by hanging parallel between roof purlins, leaving the steel purlin exposed to the conditioned space.
Field Seams:    
None - Vapor retarder is continuous throughout bay with typically no field seams. Yes - Each linear foot for every 4-5 square feet of surface area (maybe more depending on purlin spacing).
Sealing:    
Considering the Simple Saver System® features a single piece of continuous, flexible fabric liner in each bay space, only effectively sealing around the entire bay perimeter is required. In addition to effectively sealing the entire bay perimeter, the long tabs need to be continuously sealed to the top of the purlin flange. Both adjacent layers of long tab faced insulation tabs need to be overlapped and sealed on a shared purlin flange. This equates to doubling the linear foot of total purlin distance to be effectively sealed.
Simple Saver System Over-the-purling (sag n bag) insulation severely compressed
Simple Saver System® Over-the-Purlin

Simple Saver System® Over-the-Purlin
Bottom layer of unfaced fiberglass is uncompressed and full thickness, installed parallel between purlins. Upper layer of unfaced fiberglass installed perpendicular to purlins.

Support: steel strap grid pattern. Bottom side installation required.
Bottom layer of faced fiberglass is installed perpendicular, above the purlins and compressed throughout the cavity space. Upper layer of unfaced fiberglass installed parallel between purlins.

Support: none, tension is on insulation facing. Top side installation required.
Purlin Bracing (Purlin Stiffeners) Interference:

Unfaced insulation is easily cut at bracing, fluffed and recovered to full thickness.

Installation Detail

Faced insulation is limited based on the depth and location of bracing and prohibits recovery to full thickness.
Simple Saver System full thickness insulation Over the purlin - sag n bag

Simple Saver System® Over-the-Purlin
Cavity width:    
Non-standardized purlin spacing is typically not an issue because the vapor retarder is not glued or laminated onto the fiberglass. Unfaced insulation is cut to size between/parallel with the purlins, completely filling the cavity width. Cavity width is less relevant due to the installation method with the bottom layer installed perpendicular atop the purlins.

TOP: Screw down roof without thermal spacer blocks. No purlin bracing shown in the purlin cavity.

BOTTOM: Standing seam roof with thermal spacer blocks atop the purlins. Purlin bracing present in the cavity. Unfaced fiberglass insulation cut and fluffed around purlin bracing, maintaining desired thickness.

TOP: Screw down roof without thermal spacer blocks. No purlin bracing shown in the purlin cavity.

BOTTOM: Standing seam roof with thermal spacer blocks atop the purlins. Purlin bracing present in the cavity. Faced fiberglass insulation may be restricted and compressed by purlin bracing depending on the placement/type of bracing and deflection of the faced bottom layer, limiting desired thickness.

Assembly Height:    
Assembly height is measured from the deflection in the Syseal® fabric to the bottom of the roof panel. Non-standardized purlin spacing becomes less relevant regarding matching cavity widths for the fiberglass because the bottom layer of laminated fiberglass is installed atop and perpendicular to the purlins.

Simple Saver System® Over-the-Purlin
Simple Saver System dew pointSyseal fabric (vapor retarder) installed below all roof purlins, isolating entire steel purlins from the conditioned space typically with a single piece of fabric made to fit each bay. Each individual piece of vapor retarder is  installed perpendicular above all roof purlins leaving steel purlins exposed to the conditioned space.
Field Seams:    
None - Vapor retarder is continuous throughout bay with typically no field seams. Yes - Each linear foot for every 4-5 square feet of surface area (depends on widths of laminated fiberglass blankets).
Sealing:    
Considering the Simple Saver System features a single piece of continuous, flexible fabric liner in each bay space, only effectively sealing around the entire bay perimeter is required. In addition to effectively sealing the entire building perimeter, the tabs from adjacent fiberglass rolls are typically taped or rolled and stapled approximately every 6”-12” along the length (on both sides) of the fiberglass roll.
Join our mailing list